Dejan Ilić

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Dejan Ilić was born in Belgrade in 1965. He was the founder and editor of the publisher Fabrika knjiga (Book Factory) and the magazine REČ (Word). He graduated from the Philological Faculty in Belgrade, gained his Masters Degree on the Programme for Gender and Cultural Studies at the Central European University in Budapest, where he also gained his doctorate in the Department of Gender Studies. He writes regularly for the critical Internet portal Peščanik, which devotes itself to generally political topics in Serbia, which has writers from all over former Yugoslavia writing for it. His collected articles for Peščanik were published in book form in 2020. In his own publications, Ilić mainly deals with issues of education and transition. He also writes for Školegijum, a journal for fair education, which was founded in 2011 as a platform for the critical analysis of education policy measures and practices in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Fabrika knjiga, founded in October 2003, mainly publishes books on the causes and consequences of the collapse of Yugoslavia and the post-Yugoslav wars. Other editions are devoted to various genres, from fiction to comics to theoretical treatises. In his publishing house, Dejan Ilić regularly publishes works by writers from Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, mostly university professors, journalists and writers who treat questions of dealing with the past and the endangerment of human rights.

Publications:
Srbija u kontinuitetu. Peščanik, 2020.
Fantastična škola. Fabrika knjiga, 2020.
Dva lica patriotizma. Fabrika knjiga, 2016.
Škola za ‘petparačke’ priče: predlozi za drugačiji kurikulum. Fabrika knjiga, 2016.
Tranziciona pravda i tumačenje književnosti: srpski primer. Fabrika knjiga, 2011.
Osam i po ogleda iz razumevanja. Fabrika knjiga, 2008.

Festival Content

LANGUAGE ARCHIPELAGO I

FORMER-YU – Our language(s)

⇒ Tickets 3€ | Festival Pass 19€ 

A conversation among neighbours

The question as to whether Bosnian, Montenegrin, Croatian and Serbian are ultimately just variants of a ‘common’, pluricentric language or languages in their own right is one that can probably only be answered in political terms. What is plain is that everyone in the region understands each other’s languages 99 % of the time. Everyone agrees on that.

Kralj ČačkaDejan IlićSenka MarićIvana BodrožićMascha Dabić